Category Archives: Digital Preservation

Egypt Looters Ransack Archaeological Sites | @pritheworld

Since Hosni Mubarak’s government fell last year, many of Egypt’s museums have been looted.

And the looting has gone beyond museums — now criminals are digging up archaeological sites and stealing their treasures.

Anchor Marco Werman speaks with Carol Redmount, an archaeologist at the University of California, about her efforts to stop the looting in Egypt.

Redmount described the looters stealing from El-Hibeh’s archaeological dig as “essentially a gang of criminals, headed by a master criminal, who escaped from jail after the revolution.”

via Egypt Looters Ransack Archaeological Sites | @pritheworld.

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IMSLP/Petrucci Music Library: Free Public Domain Sheet Music

IMSLP stands for International Music Score Library Project. The logo is a capital letter A, taken from the very first press-printed book of polyphonic music, theHarmonice Musices Odhecaton, published in 1501. Its printer, Ottaviano Petrucci, is this library’s namesake.

Browse scores

IMSLP/Petrucci Music Library: Free Public Domain Sheet Music.

cdli – penn museum

View the Nippur Collection

Penn tablets by period:

   Late Uruk (ca. 3400-3000 BC)
   Proto-Elamite (ca. 3100-2900 BC)
   Early Dynastic I-II (ca. 2900-2700 BC)
   Early Dynastic IIIa (ca. 2600 BC)
   Early Dynastic IIIb (ca. 2500-2350 BC)
   Old Akkadian (ca. 2350-2200 BC)
   Lagash II (ca. 2200-2100 BC)
   Ur III period (ca. 2100-2000 BC)
   Old Assyrian (ca. 2000-1900 BC)
   Early Old Babylonian (ca. 2000-1800 BC)
   Old Babylonian (ca. 1800-1600 BC)
   Middle Babylonian (ca. 1500-1000 BC)
   Middle Assyrian (ca. 1500-1000 BC)
   Neo-Assyrian (ca. 1000-600 BC)
   Neo-Babylonian (ca. 1000-540 BC)
   Achaemenid (ca. 540-330 BC)
   Hellenistic (ca. 330-140 BC)
   Uncertain date

Penn tablets by provenience (only major sites):

   Abu Hatab
   Babylon
   Drehem
   Fara
   Girsu
   Kültepe
   Malyan
   Nippur
   Tell Billa
   Umma
   Ur

Penn tablets by text genre:

   Administrative texts
   Legal texts
   Literary texts
   Omina
   Lexical texts
   Mathematical texts
   School texts
   Scientific texts
   Royal/Monumental texts

Search all CDLI inscriptions


The tablet to the right (CBS 16106) contains on the top surface the impression of a diorite brick stamp said, in the neo-Assyrian inscription on the reverse surface, to have been found by a scribe in Naram-Sin’s palace in Agade, the capital of the Old Akkadian empire (ca. 2300 and 700 BC, respectively). The lower image offers a mirrored representation of the original stamp, in the orientation in which it would have been read in lines from top to bottom, and from right to left (click image to be directed to the text’s corresponding CDLI page).

via cdli – penn museum.

Cup Inside
Preview!

Statistical methods for assessing agreement between two methods of clinical measurement

        SUMMARY

In clinical measurement comparison of a new measurement technique with an established one is often needed to see whether they agree sufficiently for the new to replace the old. Such investigations are often analysed inappropriately, notably by using correlation coefficients. The use of correlation is misleading. An alternative approach, based on graphical techniques and simple calculations, is described, together with the relation between this analysis and the assessment of repeatability.

INTRODUCTION

Clinicians often wish to have data on, for example, cardiac stroke volume or blood pressure where direct measurement without adverse effects is difficult or impossible. The true values remain unknown. Instead indirect methods are used, and a new method has to be evaluated by comparison with an established technique rather than with the true quantity. If the new method agrees sufficiently well with the old, the old may be replaced. This is very different from calibration, where known quantities are measured by a new method and the result compared with the true value or with measurements made by a highly accurate method. When two methods are compared neither provides an unequivocally correct measurement, so we try to assess the degree of agreement. But how?

The correct statistical approach is not obvious. Many studies give the product-moment correlation coefficient (r) between the results of the two measurement methods as an indicator of agreement. It is no such thing. In a statistical journal we have proposed an alternative analysis, [1] and clinical colleagues have suggested that we describe it for a medical readership.

Most of the analysis will be illustrated by a set of data (Table 1) collected to compare two methods of measuring peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR).

 

INAPPROPRIATE USE OF CORRELATION COEFFICIENT

The second step is usually to calculate the correlation coefficient (r) between the two methods. For the data in fig 1, r = 0.94 (p < 0.001). The null hypothesis here is that the measurements by the two methods are not linearly related. The probability is very small and we can safely conclude that PEFR measurements by the mini and large meters are related. However, this high correlation does not mean that the two methods agree:

(1) r measures the strength of a relation between two variables, not the agreement between them. We have perfect agreement only if the points in fig 1 lie along the line of equality, but we will have perfect correlation if the points lie along any straight line.

(2) A change in scale of measurement does not affect the correlation, but it certainly affects the agreement. For example, we can measure subcutaneous fat by skinfold calipers. The calipers will measure two thicknesses of fat. If we were to plot calipers measurement against half-calipers measurement, in the style of fig 1, we should get a perfect straight line with slope 2.0. The correlation would be 1.0, but the two measurements would not agree — we could not mix fat thicknesses obtained by the two methods, since one is twice the other.

(3) Correlation depends on the range of the true quantity in the sample. If this is wide, the correlation will be greater than if it is narrow. For those subjects whose PEFR (by peak flow meter) is less than 500 l/min, r is 0.88 while for those with greater PEFRs r is 0.90. Both are less than the overall correlation of 0.94, but it would be absurd to argue that agreement is worse below 500 l/min and worse above 500 l/min than it is for everybody. Since investigators usually try to compare two methods over the whole range of values typically encountered, a high correlation is almost guaranteed.

(4) The test of significance may show that the two methods are related, but it would be amazing if two methods designed to measure the same quantity were not related. The test of significance is irrelevant to the question of agreement.

(5) Data which seem to be in poor agreement can produce quite high correlations. For example, Serfontein and Jaroszewicz [2] compared two methods of measuring gestational age. Babies with a gestational age of 35 weeks by one method had gestations between 34 and 39.5 weeks by the other, but r was high (0.85). On the other hand, Oldham et al. [3] compared the mini and large Wright peak flow meters and found a correlation of 0.992. They then connected the meters in series, so that both measured the same flow, and obtained a “material improvement” (0.996). If a correlation coefficient of 0.99 can be materially improved upon, we need to rethink our ideas of what a high correlation is in this context. As we show below, the high correlation of 0.94 for our own data conceals considerable lack of agreement between the two instruments.

MEASURING AGREEMENT

It is most unlikely that different methods will agree exactly, by giving the identical result for all individuals. We want to know by how much the new method is likely to differ from the old: if this is not enough to cause problems in clinical interpretation we can replace the old method by the new or use the two interchangeably. If the two PEFR meters were unlikely to give readings which differed by more than, say, 10 l/min, we could replace the large meter by the mini meter because so small a difference would not affect decisions on patient management. On the other hand, if the meters could differ by 100 l/min, the mini meter would be unlikely to be satisfactory. How far apart measurements can be without causing difficulties will be a question of judgment. Ideally, it should be defined in advance to help in the interpretation of the method comparison and to choose the sample size.

The first step is to examine the data. A simple plot of the results of one method against those of the other (fig 1) though without a regression line is a useful start but usually the data points will be clustered near the line and it will be difficult to assess between-method differences. A plot of the difference between the methods against their mean may be more informative. Fig 2 displays considerable lack of agreement between the large and mini meters, with discrepancies of up to 80 l/min, these differences are not obvious from fig 1. The plot of difference against mean also allows us to investigate any possible relationship between the measurement error and the true value. We do not know the true value, and the mean of the two measurements is the best estimate we have. It would be a mistake to plot the difference against either value separately because the difference will be related to each, a well-known statistical artefact. [4]

via Statistical methods for assessing agreement between two methods of clinical measurement.

amor mundi: Hannah Arendt on Technology and Nature

We have seen that the animal laborens could be redeemed from its predicament of imprisonment in the ever-recurring cycle of the life process, of being subject to the necessity of labor and consumption, only through the mobilization of another human capacity, the capacity for making, fabricating, and producing of homo faber, who as a toolmaker not only eases the pain and trouble of laboring but also erects a world of durability. The redemption of life, which is sustained by labor, is worldliness, which is sustained by fabrication. We saw furthermore that homo faber could be redeemed from his predicament of meaninglessness, the “devaluation of all values,” and the impossibility of finding valid standards in a world determined by the category of means and ends, only through the interrelated faculties of action and speech, which produce meaningful stories as naturally as fabrication produces use objects. If it were not outside the scope of these considerations, one could add the predicament of thought to these instances; for thought, too, is unable to “think itself” out of predicaments which the very activity of thinking engenders. What in each of these instances saves man — man qua animal laborens, qua homo faber, qua thinker — is something altogether different; it comes from the outside — not, to be sure, outside of man, but outside each of the respective activities. From the viewpoint of the animal laborens, it is like a miracle that it is also a being which knows of and inhabots a world; from the viewpoint of homo faber it is like a miracle, like the revelation of divinity, that meaning should have a place in that world.The case of action and actions predicament is altogether different. Here, the remedy against the irreversibility and unpredictability of the process started by acting does not arise out of another and possibly higher faculty, but is one of the potentialities of action itself. The possible redemption from the predicament of irreversibility — of being unable to undo what one has done though one did not, and could not, have known what he was doing — is the faculty of forgiving. The remedy for unpredictability, for the chaotic uncertainty of the future, is contained in the faculty to make and keep promises. The two faculties belong together in so far as one of them, forgiving, serves to undo the deeds of the past, whose “sins” hang like Damocles sword over every new generation; and the other, binding oneself through promises, serves to set up in the ocean of uncertainty, which the future is by definition, islands of security without which not even continuity, let alone durability of any kind, would be possible in the relationships between men.Without being forgiven, released from the consequences of what we have done, our capacity to act would, as it were, be confined to one single deed from which we could never recover; we would remain the victims of its consequences forever, not unlike the sorcerers apprentice who lacked the magic formula to break the spell. Without being bound to the fulfillment of promises, we would never be able to keep our identities; we would be condemned to wander helplessly and without direction in the darkness of each mans lonely heart, caught in its contradictions and equivocations — a darkness which only the light shed over the public realm through the presence of others, who confirm the identity between the one who promises and the one who fulfills, can dispel. Both faculties therefore, depend on plurality, on the presence and acting of others, for no one can forgive himself and no one can feel bound to a promise made only to himself; forgiving and promising enacted in solitude or isolation remain without reality and can signify no more than a role played before ones self.

via amor mundi: Hannah Arendt on Technology and Nature.

Public Lab DIY Spectrometry Kit by Jeffrey Yoo Warren — Kickstarter

Public Lab DIY Spectrometry Kit by Jeffrey Yoo Warren — Kickstarter.

New 3d scanner!!! Oh, and there is a new x box.

Kotaku has details on the ways in which Kinect has been improved since the devices first release in 2010, take a look at the diagrams below.  I know some of the details on it are bothering some people (with apologies to gamers [those who are really funding this tool and allowing it to be mass produced] my interests lie beside the intended uses),  the possibilities as a scanning device are making me drool a little (ok, a lot).  Please, please, Microsoft, help this become a tool that is used in multiple fields… keep it as potentially open as the original Kinect (or more).  The results available from the original are pretty great, I have used it, and tested it out a bit, checking resolutions and details; but seeing these specs…

via The Next Xbox Has Mandatory Kinect, Game-Swapping and New Controllers, According To Leaked Info.

Archaeoastronomy programs

Archaeoastronomy programs.

National Archeological Database-MAPS

National Archeological Database-MAPS.

FAMSI © 2010 Luisa Maffi – A Tzeltal Maya Dictionary

FAMSI © 2010 Luisa Maffi – A Tzeltal Maya Dictionary.

Click to download the report in PDF format:

A Tzeltal Maya Dictionary  (108 KB)

Practical Spectral Photography :: Institut für Computergraphik und Algorithmen – Arbeitsgruppe für Computergraphik

Abstract

We introduce a low-cost and compact spectral imaging camera design based on unmodified consumer cameras and a custom camera objective. The device can be used in a high-resolution configuration that measures the spectrum of a column of an imaged scene with up to 0.8 nm spectral resolution, rivalling commercial non-imaging spectrometers, and a mid-resolution hyperspectral mode that allows the spectral measurement of a whole image, with up to 5 nm spectral resolution and 120×120 spatial resolution. We develop the necessary calibration methods based on halogen/fluorescent lamps and laser pointers to acquire all necessary information about the optical system. We also derive the mathematical methods to interpret and reconstruct spectra directly from the Bayer array images of a standard RGGB camera. This objective design introduces accurate spectral remote sensing to computational photography, with numerous applications in color theory, colorimetry, vision and rendering, making the acquisition of a spectral image as simple as taking a high-dynamic-range image.

via Practical Spectral Photography :: Institut für Computergraphik und Algorithmen – Arbeitsgruppe für Computergraphik.

Bertrand Russell and F.C. Copleston Debate the Existence of God, 1948 | Open Culture

On January 28, 1948 the British philosophers F.C. Copleston and Bertrand Russell squared off on BBC radio for a debate on the existence of God. Copleston was a Jesuit priest who believed in God. Russell maintained that while he was technically agnostic on the existence of the Judeo-Christian God–just as he was technically agnostic on the existence of the Greek gods Zeus and Poseidon–he was for all intents and purposes an atheist.

via Bertrand Russell and F.C. Copleston Debate the Existence of God, 1948 | Open Culture.

The Photographs That Prevented World War III | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine

Swooping over the target at a mere 1,000 feet, Ecker turned on his cameras, which shot roughly four frames a second, or one frame for every 70 yards he traveled. Banking away from the site, the pilots returned to Florida, landing at the naval air station in Jacksonville. The film was flown to Andrews Air Force Base outside Washington, D.C. and driven by armed CIA couriers to the National Photographic Interpretation Center, a secret facility occupying an upper floor of a Ford dealership in a derelict block at Fifth and K streets in Northwest Washington. Half a dozen analysts pored over some 3,000 feet of newly developed film overnight.

via The Photographs That Prevented World War III | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine.

Maker Faire 2012 New York – Attack of The 3D Printer Bots – HotHardware

Maker Faire 2012 New York – Attack of The 3D Printer Bots – HotHardware.

All-Star Lineup Invests in MakerBot

All-Star Lineup Invests in MakerBot.

Child Labor & Lewis Hine – a set on Flickr

Working as an investigative photographer for the National Child Labor Committee (NCLC),Lewis Hine (1874-1940) portrayed working and living conditions of children in the United States between 1908 and 1924. 

The Library of Congress’ National Child Labor Committee Collection includes more than 5,100 photographs that came with the records of the organization. Many of the pictures are familiar, but others are relatively unexplored. Accompanying original captions, often rich with detail, offer clues for learning more about individuals, places, and work environments from a hundred years ago.

Do some of the pictures (or captions) seem heavy-handed? This was definitely photography with a purpose: to support the NCLC’s efforts to promote the “rights, awareness, dignity, well-being and education of children and youth as they relate to work and working.” Hine traveled to many parts of the United States, documenting children at work in factories, fields, and doing piece work at home. He also used the photographs to portray the consequences of child labor, including its impact on the health, safety, and education of the next generation. In some cases, the photographs suggest solutions, including organized and healthful activities for the nation’s youth.

The conditions Hine operated under were far from ideal. He referred to his work as “detective work,” and his captions often provide details of the names, ages, hours, and wages of the people he photographed, as well as the name of a “witness” who accompanied him. Supervisors and workers frequently regarded him with suspicion. Hurried work under these conditions may explain why some information Hine recorded has proven inaccurate.

It’s evident in many of the photographs that the workers were highly conscious of the camera. Nevertheless, Hine sometimes caught unguarded moments and playful interaction, as well as many memorable faces. Hine also used photographs to show what wasn’t there—for example, an almost-empty school at harvest time. And sometimes, whatever the photographer intended, the people in the photograph simply saw the occasion as an opportunity for a family portrait.

Did people see the photos at the time? The NCLC made a concerted effort to show the pictures to the public, including them in its own publications and placing them in newspapers and progressive publications. The photos also appeared in stereopticon slide shows and in displays that the NCLC circulated. 

We hope the photographs offer an opportunity for continuing exploration and reflection. 

Learn more:

• View background information.

• View sources for reading about Hine’s workand the National Child Labor Committee, including research about individuals in the photos.

• View a sample National Child Labor Committee report, showing how information on Maryland’s canning industry integrated references to the photos into the text.

• View an example of how the high resolution digital files available through the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Online Catalog enable viewing of details (sometimes gory ones) that drive home the message of the photographs: “Bringing an NCLC Photo into Focus.”

• View the U.S. National Archives’ set of Lewis Hine photos from the Progressive Era.

Child Labor & Lewis Hine – a set on Flickr.

The RIAA knew SOPA and PIPA were useless, yet supported them anyway | ITworld

The RIAA knew SOPA and PIPA were useless, yet supported them anyway

The industry knows that most music files are swapped offline, notes Torrent Freak. So why is the RIAA still asking ISPs to spy on us?

via The RIAA knew SOPA and PIPA were useless, yet supported them anyway | ITworld.

Students find rare Roman temple on practice dig – The Local

Students find rare Roman temple on practice dig – The Local.

NPLdigital – YouTube

NPLdigital – YouTube.